« E is for Eggplant | Main | G is for Gulay »

Monday, 12 July 2010

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

ClubPenguin

Her father was from Pangasinan, and she didn't know anything about his roots as she was born in Hawaii!

Torrent Download

Your photo was the exact photo that I found in a calendar about Filipino-American history. It was that photo that told me that my dad had picked asparagus at some point in his life.

Kitchen Kwento

Thank you for the stories, insights and lessons on farmers and food. Connections with farming are such a rich place to unearth, from environmental justice to culinary memory...

Ellen

I FINALLY got to read your blog today, Aileen-y! Maraming salamat for this page. Did I ever mention to you, perhaps in passing, that when I was growing up I used to visit your great-lolo Faus in a place called Patalan, a farmland beyond the barrio Nebalew in Pangasinan, across a vast river, so far away from civilization (I used to think then as a grade schooler). My lake (lolo) Faus tilted the soil every morning the old fashion way by using a carabao pulling the plow "machine" to bring out the produce; then your tita Edna and I stayed behind him to pick up the produce, which is one of my faves, SWEET potatoes! Such nostalgic memories... This is a story re. one of your direct farmer ancestors. MOM

Albert

Damn, there is so much history I have yet to unravel about my dad. Your photo was the exact photo that I found in a calendar about Filipino-American history. It was that photo that told me that my dad had picked asparagus at some point in his life. http://www.flickr.com/photos/filipeanut/2988388934/in/set-72157608525524843/

I also find it beautifully ironic that even though the ties between Mexico and the Philippines were severed when the Manila-Acapulco trade stopped, the relationship went on in California farmlands, and even today, in the Mission district where you find Filipino-Mexican food fusion.

Judith

Aileen, when my mom was here for the holidays, she picked up my copy of Carlos Bulosan's book and could NOT put it down 'til she finished. Her father was from Pangasinan, and she didn't know anything about his roots as she was born in Hawaii! So, at the age of almost 80, she is discovering herself in small ways! :-) Wish she could FB so she could read your blog, as she LOVES to cook, too!

Myla

Just about every male (and some female relatives, too) from my uncles back to my grandpa and great uncles on my mom's side worked in the fields of the San Joaquin valley. Sometimes I chose to tell the students (on my environmental justice/ecology field trips) I'm working with that the reason why I care about organic food is that I remember my grandpa coming home on weekends from the campo with his clothes covered in dust. I knew that some of that "dust" was actually pesticides and other chemicals sprayed on produce and dropped from crop dusters. Then we would we go grocery shopping, and I would see fresh asparagus and grapes on the shelves and know that many people had to be covered in dust to put that on the shelves. If I can afford it (talk about an EJ issue!), I try to buy organic as much as possible because I don't want anyone else's grandpa getting pesticides dropped on him. My mom to this day still uses an asparagus knife to garden in her backyard in Stockton, and it probably has not cut asparagus in a field in close to 30 years.

Elena

We'll be happy to take you to an asparagus farm, demonstrate the art of cutting asparagus from its roots (symbolic of the Manongs' life in my mind!), the peat-dusty open field (the color of Atis/Aetas in my mind), the hauling of thousands of spears from end to end of the farm bed, and hear the lovely tale of why there is such a thing as white asparagus - guess why?

Dawn

the pic you used is a particular favorite of mine. it was taken in the Stockton area in the late 1920s by a Filipino American photographer, John Y. Billones. I use it often to illustrate to my students how asparagus cutting is such hard, backbreaking work that requires skill, endurance, and resilience, and that then, as now, asparagus is harvested by hand one by one.

Rashaan

Love this post, Aileen. My grandparents on both sides, Mexican & Filipino each worked on the Central Valley farms as well as my parents when they were young adults. The San Joaquin Valley is the spine to our state and to my family history.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Please note: Images and text on kitchenkwento.com are the copyrighted property of Aileen Suzara, unless otherwise credited. No part of this site may be copied, reproduced, republished or distributed without express written consent. Thank you!
Related Posts with Thumbnails